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The great trouble : a mystery of London, the blue death, and a boy called Eel / Deborah Hopkinson.

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  • 34 of 35 copies available at Bibliomation. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Rockville Public Library.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Rockville Public Library J HOP (Text to phone) 34035132721412 Juvenile Fiction Available -

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Content descriptions

General Note: Nutmeg Award Nominee, Intermediate, 2016.
Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 245-247).
Summary, etc.: Eel, an orphan, and his best friend Florrie must help Dr. John Snow prove that cholera is spread through water, and not poisonous air, when an epidemic sweeps across their London neighborhood in 1854.
Awards Note:
Nutmeg Award Nominee, Intermediate, 2016.
Subject: Cholera Fiction
Epidemics Fiction
Orphans Fiction
London (England) History 19th century Fiction
Great Britain History Victoria, 1837-1901 Fiction
Snow, John 1813-1858 Juvenile fiction
Cholera Juvenile fiction
Epidemics Juvenile fiction
Orphans Juvenile fiction
London (England) History 19th century Juvenile fiction
Great Britain History Victoria, 1837-1901 Juvenile fiction
Genre: Historical fiction.
Medical fiction.
Mystery fiction.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9780375848186
The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel
The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel
by Hopkinson, Deborah
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BookList Review

The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

Equal parts medical mystery, historical novel, and survival story about the 1854 London cholera outbreak, this introduces Eel, a boy trying to make ends meet on Broad Street. When he visits one of his regular employers, he learns the man has fallen ill. Eel enlists the help of Dr. Snow, and together they work to solve the mystery of what exactly is causing the spread of cholera and how they can prevent it. Steeped in rich fact and detailed explanations about laboratory research, Hopkinson's book uses a fictional story to teach readers about science, medicine, and history and works in a few real-life characters, too. Eel serves as a peek into the lower class of London society and offers readers a way to observe and, hopefully, ask questions about the scientific method. An author's note provides readers with a look at the real story behind the novel, making this a great choice for introducing readers to science and history.--Thompson, Sarah Bean Copyright 2010 Booklist

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9780375848186
The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel
The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel
by Hopkinson, Deborah
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Publishers Weekly Review

The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Set amid the 1854 London cholera outbreak, Hopkinson's attention-grabbing story of Eel, an orphan who survives by combing the filthy banks of the Thames for anything he might sell, is a delightful combination of race-against-the-clock medical mystery and outwit-the-bad-guys adventure. Eel, a hardworking and bighearted kid with no shortage of crummy luck, is being hunted by a notoriously mean crook, who happens to be his stepfather. When the first cholera case hits, the town blames the polluted air, but Eel and his mentor, Dr. Snow, have a different theory-that it's being spread through a local water pump-which they set out to prove before the death toll escalates further. Hopkinson (Titanic: Voices from the Disaster) adeptly recreates the crowded, infested streets of London, but it's her distinct, layered characters and turbulent, yet believable plot that make this a captivating read. As the deadly disease worsens, Dr. Snow and Eel's deadline looms, and Eel's past closes in on him, readers will feel the same sense of urgency-and excitement-as the characters themselves. Ages 10-up. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Syndetic Solutions - School Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9780375848186
The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel
The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel
by Hopkinson, Deborah
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School Library Journal Review

The Great Trouble : A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel

School Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 5-8-Hopkinson's historical novel (Knopf, 2013) transports listeners to 1854 London at the time of the famous Broad Street pump cholera epidemic. Fictional and real characters and events are adeptly mixed to create an informative and gripping tale. The main character is the titular "boy called Eel," a likable orphan working odd jobs to take care of his little brother and keep them out of the work houses and the clutches of Fisheye Bill Tyler. Dr. John Snow, the real-life doctor who traced the cause of the outbreak, is introduced when Eel asks for the prominent doctor's help with "The Great Trouble." Keeping in mind Snow's controversial theory about the spread of the disease, Eel and the doctor work together to gather evidence from affected families and convince the town committee to shut off the Broad Street pump. The author successfully conveys the race against time as the "blue death" spreads rapidly, killing more than 600 people before Snow and Eel can stop it. Matthew Frow does a wonderful job of recreating the distinct accents that existed among Londoners and their various stations, although Eel's accent is so thick that he can be difficult to understand. Historical notes, read by Kimberly Farr, will satisfy listeners whose curiosity has been piqued. Hand this novel to fans of The Apprenticeship of Lucas Whitaker by Cynthia DeFelice and Fever 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson.-Terri Norstrom, Cary Area Library, IL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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